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Yak Chaam A dance performed in Sikkim to honour the yak, an animal on which man is completely dependent upon for survival at high altitudes. The dance depicts the yak and projects the simple life style of the herdsman in the mountains

Sikkim is situated on the eastern Himalayas, in the shadow of the towering Mount Kanchenjunga, which is worshipped as the principal deity, Sikkim is surrounded by Tibet, Nepal and Bhutan on three sides and with West Bengal on the fourth. The grandeur of its mountain peaks, lush valleys, fast flowing rivers, terraced hills and incredible floral wealth, makes Sikkim a unique and unforgettable state.  The population of Sikkim comprises three main groups of people, the Lepchas, Bhutias and the Nepalis. These three communities have their own unique culture and traditions.

 
The sitar owes its origin to Amir khusro who lived in the 13th century. The instrument's name is derived from the Persian ‘ seh-tar ', ‘three-stringed'. It belongs to the lute family and is made from a seasoned gourd, which acts as a resonating chamber, and teakwood. The most popular stringed instrument among Hindustani musicians,  

 

 
 

Image depicts one of the scene from Jataka tales. These tales forms the main theme of the paintings in the Ajanta caves. The Ajanta Caves are situated 108 kms. north-east of Aurangabad. They are carved in rock in the form of a horse-shoe with stream Waghora flowing th rough it. Thirty Buddhist caves; some unfinished comprising of either viharas(monastic halls) or chaityas(chapels) are situated in its surroundings

 

From mid-January to mid-February the clear blue skies over

Punjab, Rajasthan and Gujarat in India, and Lahore in Pakistan, come alive with the gaiety and colour of paper kites – in all hues, shapes and sizes. Kite flying in the Punjab is associated with Basant Panchami – the onset of spring. It is also commonly known as Basant. The yellow of mustard flowers and the Amaltas trees is the first colour to be sighted after the severe winters of the north. Traditionally, on this day- 5 th of the lunar month of Magh – children and women wear yellow – and men folk in Rajasthan wear yellow turbans. Spring heralds new beginnings and the colourful kites in the sky are a statement of this joyous awakening.

 

 

 
  The Baul songs are a very specialised branch of Bengali folk songs. Baul means madcap and is derived from bayu (in Sanskrit vayu) depicting a sense of nerve current. Baul has become the appellation of those who do not conform to established societal cannons or customs. They revel only in the gladness of their own welling love. According to them, “in love we rejoice in song and dance with each and all.”